Viruses of bees

 

Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV or APV)

A Dicistroviridae (RNA). Antisera will cross-react with Kashmir bee virus

Plays a role in CCD infested with Varroa

Abnormal trembling in adult bees. Some paralysis that limits flight and bloated abdomens.

Infected bees may be crawling on ground and up grass stems.

Infected bees have reduced hair cover and appear black and shiny

Death of the bees is rapid.

Control -

Destroy the colony and burn all bees and combs

Do not reuse combs from infected colonies

Sterilise the inside of the super by scorching with a blow torch

Control Varroa

Chronic bee paralysis virus (CPBV)

 

Abnormal trembling in adult bees. Some paralysis that limits flight and bloated abdomens.

Infected bees may be crawling on ground and up grass stems.

Infected bees have reduced hair cover and appear black and shiny

Control -

Destroy the colony and burn all bees and combs

Do not reuse combs from infected colonies

Sterilise the inside of the super by scorching with a blow torch.

This is as yet an unclassified ovoid RNA virus.

Israel Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV)

 

A Dicistroviridae (RNA). Plays a role in CCD. May be considered a marker.

Slow Paralysis virus (SPV)

 

Dead shriveled larvae in sealed cells. Associated with Varroa

Control

Destroy the colony and burn all bees and combs

Do not reuse combs from infected colonies

Sterilise the inside of the super by scorching with a blow torch

Keep Varroa population under control.

This is as yet an unclassified spherical RNA virus.

Kashmir Bee Virus (KBV)

 

A Dicistroviridae (RNA). Cross-reacts with Acute Paralysis Bee Virus

Varroa is a vector. This virus is often found in brood and adults.

Control

Destroy the colony and burn all bees and combs

Do not reuse combs from infected colonies

Sterilise the inside of the super by scorching with a blow torch

Keep Varroa population under control.

This is as yet an unclassified spherical RNA virus.

Black Queen Cell Virus (BQCV)

 

A Dicistroviridae (RNA).

Causes the queen larvae to turn back and die. Any queen which is born is of poor quality

Associated with Nosema.

Treatment manage Nosema. Regular brood comb changes.

May be assisted by the shook swam technique.

Deformed Wing Virus (DWV)

 

Iflavirus RNA. Associated with Varroa. May be a contributing factor in CCD.

Varroa is a vector

Bees have deformed or poorly developed wings. The pupae are infected as the white eye stage. Bees die from the virus

Control

Destroy the colony and burn all bees and combs

Do not reuse combs from infected colonies

Sterilise the inside of the super by scorching with a blow torch

Keep Varroa population under control

DSC01980

Cloudy wing virus (CWV)

 

Varroa is a vector. Causes a loss of transparency of the wing when heavily affected. Individuals soon die. Occurs in 15% of UK hives.

Control

Destroy the colony and burn all bees and combs

Do not reuse combs from infected colonies

Sterilise the inside of the super by scorching with a blow torch

Keep Varroa population under control

This is as yet an unclassified spherical RNA virus.

Sacbrood Virus (SBV) Morator aetatulus

 

Death occurs in larvae as they are about to pupate and are upright and the dead larvae are found in capped cells. Larvae change from pearly white to grey and finally black.

Head development of the pupae is retarded and the head is darker than the rest of the body.

When larvae removed from the cell they appear to be in a sac of water. The dead larvae (scales) are easy to remove. There is no characteristic odour.

The colony spontaneously recovers. Queen bee exchange can be helpful.

Filamentous virus also called the F-virus or bee rickettsiosis

 

This is associated with Nosema. The virus multiplies in the fat bodies and ovarian tissues of workers. When severely affected the haemolymph become milky associated with the number of virus particles! Peak infection seen around May with a trough in September.

Bee Virus X

 

This virus is associated with amoeba. It may shorten the bees life especially in late winter.

This is as yet an unclassified spherical RNA virus.

Bee virus Y

 

Associated with Nosema. No specific signs associated with the virus. Peak isolation occurs in the early summer.

This is as yet an unclassified spherical RNA virus.

Varroa-destructor virus 1

 

Iflavirus RNA related to Deformed wing virus

KaKugo virus

 

Iflavirus RNA related to Deformed wing virus

Invertebrate Iridescent Virus (IIV)

 

Iridiovirus DNA. Good correlation with US cases of CCD together with Nosema.

Note IIV is found in strong colonies also. Type IIV-6 is called the Chilo virus.